Wednesday, 24 April 2019

The Battle of Waterloo Bridge - in pictures

© Ryan Chapman

It was Day 7 of Extinction Rebellion’s occupation of Waterloo Bridge - one of several London sites targeted by the climate change protest group. The sun was shining, the atmosphere was radiant, but the authorities’ patience was wearing thin.


© Ryan Chapman

While the media can’t settle on whether to deride XR protesters as soap-dodging hippies or middle class do-gooders, the fact is they include both and everything in-between. They are teachers and children; nurses and lawyers. A diverse bunch. United by desperation and motivated by the undeniable urgent need for action.


© Ryan Chapman

Somewhat ironically it was the hottest Easter on record. TV weathermen could barely contain their excitement as they relayed news of soaring Bank Holiday temperatures. And what kind of twisted psychopath doesn’t love a long weekend in the sun? For the literal future of life on earth however, yet another temperature record being broken isn’t exactly news worth celebrating.


© Ryan Chapman

Several hundred people were congregated at the Waterloo-end of the bridge. Slogans were written on the asphalt with multi-coloured chalk and a mini seminar was underway, advising the gathered crowd on what to do in the event of arrest.


© Ryan Chapman

The sounds of acoustic guitars and bongos drifted across the bridge, as various protesters staged singalongs and trays of homemade chocolate cake were passed around and greeted with the kind of smiles only homemade chocolate cake can muster. 


© Ryan Chapman

Arrests were made once every ten or so minutes. There was no aggressive resistance but each protester went floppy like toddlers refusing to be carried, requiring a team of officers to take them away. Each arrest was met with warm applause for the dedication of the individual, and songs of support to the police. “We love you, we’re doing it for your children, police”.


© Ryan Chapman

Here is Waterloo Bridge's very own recycling centre. “But I thought Extinction Rebellion left places in a mess” I hear you grumble. Well, as they say, a lie gets half-way around the world before the truth has even brushed its teeth, or something. And guess what: that photo circulating online of Hyde Park strewn with litter was actually taken after a completely unrelated event and has nothing to do with climate change protesters. Fake news! Big shock!


© Ryan Chapman

In a somewhat surreal turn of events, Chris Packham - of The Really Wild Show fame - was met by cheers as he clambered on top of a bus shelter to give a speech of gratitude. My 8 year old self would be very disappointed to hear that Michaela Strachan was nowhere to be seen.


© Ryan Chapman

Chris Packham’s injection of renewed positivity signalled the start of the police’s fight-back. In their first move to clear the bridge they began the task of removing the jumbled array of pop-up tents and pot plants.


© Ryan Chapman

The police dismantled gazebos to complaints from those sheltering beneath that they would be exposed to direct sunlight. “You shouldn’t have glued yourself to the bloody bridge then” one policewoman snapped back, in the first hint of animosity I’d witnessed from either side all afternoon.


© Ryan Chapman

As more police moved in and it became clear that XR’s week-long occupation of Waterloo Bridge was coming to an end, some protesters swapped placards for brooms to begin the clear-up.


© Ryan Chapman

Whatever Extinction Rebellion’s next move, there are some certainties. 

The lazy, disingenuous and cynical attacks will continue from people with their heads in the sand. You know, the ones that try and claim you can’t possibly care about the future of humankind and go on an airplane.

The other certainty is that the problem will continue getting worse if nothing is done. And while certain lifestyle changes are important, the radical change has to come from the top. And fast.


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